WRIT W1001x or y Beginning Fiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Departmental approval NOT required. The beginning workshop in fiction is designed for students with little or no experience writing literary texts in fiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually produce their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. The focus of the course is on the rudiments of voice, character, setting, point of view, plot, and lyrical use of language. Students will begin to develop the critical skills that will allow them to read like writers and understand, on a technical level, how accomplished creative writing is produced. Outside readings of a wide range of fiction supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W1001
WRIT
1001
90996
001
W 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
A. Baker 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
1001
83441
002
M 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
S. Graham-Felsen 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
1001
16298
003
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
E. Sigman 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
1001
20946
004
W 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
J. Tseng 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W1101x or y Beginning Nonfiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisite required. Department approval NOT needed. The beginning workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with little or no experience in writing literary nonfiction. Students are introduced to a range of technical and imaginative concerns through exercises and discussions, and they eventually submit their own writing for the critical analysis of the class. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W1101
WRIT
1101
65943
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
Z. Hindin 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
1101
88943
002
W 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
E. Sherman 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W1201x or y Beginning Poetry Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. The beginning poetry workshop is designed for students who have a serious interest in poetry writing but who lack a significant background in the rudiments of the craft and/or have had little or no previous poetry workshop experience. Students will be assigned weekly writing exercises emphasizing such aspects of verse composition as the poetic line, the image, rhyme and other sound devices, verse forms, repetition, tone, irony, and others. Students will also read an extensive variety of exemplary work in verse, submit brief critical analyses of poems, and critique each other's original work.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W1201
WRIT
1201
85779
001
Th 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
E. Martinez 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W2001x or y Intermediate Fiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Intermediate workshops are for students with some experience with creative writing, and whose prior work merits admission to the class (as judged by the professor). Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops, and increased expectations to produce finished work. By the end of the semester, each student will have produced at least seventy pages of original fiction. Students are additionally expected to write extensive critiques of the work of their peers.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W2001
WRIT
2001
60796
001
W 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
M. Lee 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
2001
61896
002
M 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W2101x or y Intermediate Nonfiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing The intermediate workshop in nonfiction is designed for students with some experience in writing literary nonfiction. Intermediate workshops present a higher creative standard than beginning workshops and an expectation that students will produce finished work. Outside readings supplement and inform the exercises and longer written projects. By the end of the semester, students will have produced thirty to forty pages of original work in at least two traditions of literary nonfiction.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W2101
WRIT
2101
72846
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W2201x or y Intermediate Poetry Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Intermediate poetry workshops are for students with some prior instruction in the rudiments of poetry writing and prior poetry workshop experience. Intermediate poetry workshops pose greater challenges to students and maintain higher critical standards than beginning workshops. Students will be instructed in more complex aspects of the craft, including the poetic persona, the prose poem, the collage, open-field composition, and others. They will also be assigned more challenging verse forms such as the villanelle and also non-European verse forms such as the pantoum. They will read extensively, submit brief critical analyses, and put their instruction into regular practice by composing original work that will be critiqued by their peers. By the end of the semester each student will have assembled a substantial portfolio of finished work.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W2201
WRIT
2201
77346
001
W 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
R. Ostrom 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3001x or y Advanced Fiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Building on the work of the Intermediate Workshop, Advanced Workshops are reserved for the most accomplished creative writing students. A significant body of writing must be produced and revised. Particular attention will be paid to the components of fiction: voice, perspective, characterization, and form. Students will be expected to finish several short stories, executing a total artistic vision on a piece of writing. The critical focus of the class will include an examination of endings and formal wholeness, sustaining narrative arcs, compelling a reader's interest for the duration of the text, and generating a sense of urgency and drama in the work.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3001
WRIT
3001
76547
001
M 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
E. Avery 0 / 15 [ More Info ]
WRIT
3001
78596
002
M 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
A. Wilson 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3101x or y Advanced Nonfiction Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Advanced Nonfiction Workshop is for students with significant narrative and/or critical experience. Students will produce original literary nonfiction for the workshop, with an added focus on developing a distinctive voice and approach.

WRIT W3201x or y Advanced Poetry Workshop 3 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing This poetry workshop is reserved for accomplished poetry writers and maintains the highest level of creative and critical expectations. Students will be encouraged to develop their strengths and to cultivate a distinctive poetic vision and voice but must also demonstrate a willingness to broaden their range and experiment with new forms and notions of the poem. A portfolio of poetry will be written and revised with the critical input of the instructor and the workshop.

WRIT W3302x or y Fiction Seminar: Approaches to the Short Story 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites required. Department approval NOT required. The modern short story has gone through many transformations, and the innovations of its practitioners have often pointed the way for prose fiction as a whole. The short story has been seized upon and refreshed by diverse cultures and aesthetic affiliations, so that perhaps the only stable definition of the form remains the famous one advanced by Poe, one of its early masters, as a work of fiction that can be read in one sitting. Still, common elements of the form have emerged over the last century and this course will study them, including Point of View, Plot, Character, Setting, and Theme. John Hawkes once famously called these last four elements the "enemies of the novel," and many short story writers have seen them as hindrances as well. Hawkes later recanted, though some writers would still agree with his earlier assessment, and this course will examine the successful strategies of great writers across the spectrum of short story practice, from traditional approaches to more radical solutions, keeping in mind how one period's revolution - Hemingway, for example - becomes a later era's mainstream or "common-sense" storytelling mode. By reading the work of major writers from a writer's perspective, we will examine the myriad techniques employed for what is finally a common goal: to make readers feel. Short writing exercises will help us explore the exhilarating subtleties of these elements and how the effects created by their manipulation or even outright absence power our most compelling fictions.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3302
WRIT
3302
74692
001
Th 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
A. Graedon 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3303x or y Fiction Seminar: The Long and Short of It 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. The critic Randall Jarrell famously defined the novel as "a prose work of a certain length that has something wrong with it." In this class we will pay close attention to how writers determine the appropriate "certain length" for their narratives by focusing on another notoriously difficult-to-define form, the novella. Simply but unhelpfully, we might say that a novella is longer than a short story and shorter than a novel. But how does length affect the way a writer handles (or dispenses with) such essentials as plotting, characterization, and sense of place? What strategies are used to compress or expand time in novellas or long stories that take place in a single day, over the course of several days, or across many decades? What kind of statement can be made, and what kind of linguistic experience can be had in this intermediate length? We will start the semester by reading "flash fiction" together--stories of no more than a few hundred words--by writers such as Lydia Davis, Raymond Carver, and David Foster Wallace. Then we will read a novella a week, peering behind the curtain to see how they are put together. Authors may include Fyodor Dostoevsky, Arthur Conan Doyle, Herman Melville, James Joyce, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, Yasunari Kawabata, Albert Camus, Saul Bellow, Philip Roth, Paula Fox, Alice Munro, Roberto Bolao, Martin Amis, and George Saunders. Students will write two creative-writing assignments and give one in-class presentation.

WRIT W3304x and y Fiction Seminar: Exercises in Style 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. Raymond Queneau, in his book Exercises in Style, demonstrated that a single story, however unassuming, could be told at least ninety-nine different ways. Even though the content never changed, the mood always did: aggressive, mild, indifferent, lyrical, sensitive, technical, indirect, deceitful. If, as fiction writers, one of our pursuits is to stylize various forms of information, and to call the result a story or novel, it is also tempting, and easy, to adopt trends of style without realizing it, and to possibly presume we operate outside of stylistic restrictions and conventions. Some styles become so commonplace that they no longer seem stylistic. V.S. Naipaul remarked in an interview that he was opposed to style, yet we can't exactly summarize his work based on its content. His manner of telling is sophisticated, subtle, shrewdly indirect, and elegant. He is, in short, a stylist. His brilliance might be to presume that this is the only way to tell a story, and to consider all other ways styles. This course for writers will look at a wide range of prose styles, from conspicuous to subtle ones. We will not only read examples of obviously stylistic prose, but consider as well how the reigning prose norms are themselves stylistic bulwarks, entrenched in the culture for various reasons that might interest us. One project we will undertake, in order to deepen our understanding and approach to style, will be to restylize certain of the passages we read. These short fiction exercises will supplement our weekly readings and will allow us to practice rhetorical tactics, to assess our own deep stylistic instincts, and to possibly dilate the range of locutions available to us as we work.

WRIT W3305x and y Fiction Seminar: The First Person 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. Today, in the age of memoir, we don't need to apologize for speaking in the first person, but we still need to find a way to make a first person, fictional narrative forceful and focused. The logic is different, the danger the same: we must find a form that will shape an "I" account and render it rhetorically compelling, giving it the substance and complexity of literary art. In this seminar, we will begin by reading critical background about the early uses of first-person in fiction. We will study how these functioned in the societies they commented on, and chart the changing use of first person in western literature from the eighteenth century to today. Through reading contemporary novels, stories and novellas, we will analyze first person in its various guises: the "I" as witness (reliable or not), as elegist, outsider, interpreter, diarist, apologist, and portraitist. Towards the end of the semester we will study more unusual forms: first-person plural, first-person omniscient, first-person rotating. We will supplement our reading with craft-oriented observations by master-writers. Students will complete four to five fiction pieces of their own in which they will implement specific approaches to first-person. At least two of these will be complete stories; others may be the beginning of a novel or novella or floating scenes. Students will conference several times with the instructor to discuss their work.

WRIT W3306x or y Fiction Seminar: Voices from the Edge 3 pts.Not offered in 2014-2015. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. What does it mean to be marginalized? Does it simply mean that white folks or men or heterosexuals or Americans don't listen to you very much? This is a reductive way of thinking that limits both minorities and majorities. In this seminar we'll read work that challenges our received notions about "the edge" and who's in it. We'll read with an eye toward issues of race, class, gender, and sexuality but we'll also think about marginalization in terms of genre, geography, and even personal politics. Our goal won't be to categorize and quantify hardships, but to appreciate some great--though overlooked--writing. And, finally, to try and understand how these talented artists wrote well. During the semester students will write short fiction inspired by the work they read and the craft issues discussed in class.

WRIT W3307x or y Fiction Seminar: Eccentrics & Outsiders 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. Some of the greatest works of fiction are narrated by characters who have become unhinged from the norms of society. They may stand apart from the mainstream because of willful eccentricity, madness, even social disgrace, but in each case their alienation provides them with a unique perspective, one that allows the reader to see the world they describe without the dulling lens of convention. We will explore what authors might gain by narrating their works from an "outsider" viewpoint, and we will study how the peculiar form and structure of these books reflects the modernist impulse in literature. This is a seminar designed for fiction writers, so we will spend time talking about not only the artistic merits of these books, but also about how the authors, who include Dostoevsky, Knut Hamsun, Jean Rhys, Denis Johnson, Joy Williams, Samuel Beckett and Amos Tutuola, achieve their specific effects. Over the course of the semester, we will use these texts as a springboard for writing original fiction.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3307
WRIT
3307
18147
001
Th 4:10p - 6:00p
TBA
S. Lipsyte 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

NOTE: This seminar has a workshop component.

WRIT W3308y Seminar: Short Prose Forms 3 pts. Prerequisites: Please go to 617 Kent or http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing for registration guidelines The prose poem and its siblings the short short story and the brief personal essay are the wild cards in the writer's deck; their identities change according to the dealer. We will consider a wide range of forms, approaches, and styles, spanning centuries. In addition to works in English, we will read translations from the French, Spanish, Russian, Italian, Japanese, and Chinese. Seminar discussions will be complemented by frequent writing exercises (inside and outside of class) and some abbreviated workshopping of student pieces. Each student will make one brief classroom presentation. Authors include: Matsuo Basho, Charles Baudelaire, Thomas Bernhard, Aloysius Bertrand, Jorge Luis Borges, Anne Carson, Gianni Celati, Luis Cernuda, Bernard Cooper, Lydia Davis, Russell Edson, David Ignatow, Max Jacob, Juan Ramon Jimenez, Joseph Joubert, Franz Kafka, Yasunari Kawabata, Etgar Keret, Stephane Mallarme, Czeslaw Milosz, Harryette Mullen, Edgar Allan Poe, Francis Ponge, Arthur Rimbaud, Nathalie Sarraute, Sei Shonagon, Charles Simic, Mark Strand, Luisa Valenzuela, Diane Williams, James Wright, Mikhail Zoshchenko.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3308
WRIT
3308
61532
001
Tu 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
A. DeWitt 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3331x and y Nonfiction Seminar: The Modern Arts Writer 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites required. Department approval NOT required. This course will examine the lineaments of critical writing. A critic blends the subjective and objective in complex ways. A critic must know the history of an artwork, (its past), while placing it on the contemporary landscape and contemplating its future. A single essay will analyze, argue, descrube, reflect and interpret. And, since examining a work of art also means examining oneself, the task includes a willingness to prjobe one's own assumptions and biases. The best critics are engaged in a conversation -- a dialogue, a debate -- with changing standards of taste, with their audience, with their own convictions and emotions. The best criticism is part if a larger cultural conversation. It spurs readers to ask questions rather than accept answers about art and society. We will read essays that consider six art forms: literature; film; music (classical, jazz and popular); theatre and performance; visual art; and dance. At the term's end, students will consider essays that examine cultural boundaries and divisions: the negotiations between popular and high art; the aesthetic of cruelty; the post-modern blurring of and between artist, critic and fan. The reading list will include such writers as Virginia Woolf, George Orwell, Elizabeth Hardwick, Roland Barthes, (literature); James Agee, Manny Farber, Pauline Kael, Zadie Smith (film); G.B. Shaw, Willa Cather, Ralph Ellison, Gerald Early, Lester Bangs, Ellen Willis (music); Eric Bentley, Mary McCarthy, C.L.R. James (theatre); Leo Steinberg, Frank O'Hara, Ada Louise Huxtable, Maggie Nelson (visual art); Edwin Denby, Arlene Croce, Elizabeth Kendall, Mindy Aloff (dance); Susan Sontag, Anthony Heilbut, John Jeremiah Sullivan (cultural criticism).

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3331
WRIT
3331
24693
001
W 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
M. Jefferson 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3333y Nonfiction Seminar: Traditions in Nonfiction 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. The seminar provides exposure to the varieties of nonfiction with readings in its principal genres: reportage, criticism and commentary, biography and history, and memoir and the personal essay. A highly plastic medium, nonfiction allows authors to portray real events and experiences through narrative, analysis, polemic or any combination thereof. Free to invent everything but the facts, great practitioners of nonfiction are faithful to reality while writing with a voice and a vision distinctively their own. To show how nonfiction is conceived and constructed, class discussions will emphasize the relationship of content to form and style, techniques for creating plot and character under the factual constraints imposed by nonfiction, the defining characteristics of each author's voice, the author's subjectivity and presence, the role of imagination and emotion, the uses of humor, and the importance of speculation and attitude. Written assignments will be opportunities to experiment in several nonfiction genres and styles.

WRIT W3335x Nonfiction Seminar: The Lyric Essay 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. While nonfiction is perhaps known for its allegiance to facts and logic in the stalwart essay form, the genre conducts its own experiments, often grouped under the term "lyric essays." Lyric essays are sometimes fragmentary, suggestive, meditative, inconclusive; they may glance only sidelong at their subject, employ the compression of poetry, and perform magic tricks in which stories slip down blind alleys, discursive arguments dissolve into ellipses, and narrators disappear altogether. Lyric essayists blend a passion for the actual with innovative forms, listening deeply to the demands of each new subject. In this course, students will map the terrain of the lyric essay, work in which writers revise nonfiction traditions such as: coherent narrative or rhetorical arcs; an identifiable, transparent, or stable narrator; and the familiar categories of memoir, personal essay, travel writing, and argument. Students will read work that challenges these familiar contours, including selections from Halls of Fame by John D'Agata, Don't Let Me Be Lonely by Claudia Rankine, Plainwater by Anne Carson, Letters to Wendy by Joe Wenderoth, The Body and One Love Affair by Jenny Boully, Roland Barthes by Roland Barthes, Running in the Family by Michael Ondaatje, Neck Deep and Other Predicaments by Ander Monson. They can expect to read essays selected from The Next American Essay edited by John D'Agata and In Short: A Collection of Brief Creative Nonfiction edited by Judith Kitchen and Mary Paumier Jones, as well as essays by Paul Metcalf, David Foster Wallace, Sherman Alexie, Michael Martone, and Sei Shonagon. The course will be conducted seminar style, with close reading, lecture, and classroom discussion. The students will be expected to prepare a written study and comments for class on a particular book/author/issue. They will also complete writing exercises and their own lyric essay(s), one of which we will discuss as a class. Their final project will be a collection of their creative work accompanied by an essay discussing their choices.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3335
WRIT
3335
76779
001
Th 6:10p - 8:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3336x or y Translation Seminar: Kafka's Legacy 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. Corequisites: This course is open to Undergraduate & Graduate students.
No knowledge of German required. What's so riveting about a giant bug filled with all-too-human thoughts, a nameless rodent manically guarding the many branches of his underground lair or a man who, finding himself arrested , spends the rest of his life trying to discover the charge? Kafka's macabre and strangely humorous parables have been embraced by many different sorts of readers - and inspired countless literary spinoffs not to mention translations. In this seminar, we will be reading lots of Kafka (his novels The Castle and The Trial, and many of his stories, diaries and fragments) along with some of the older German tales inspired him, and a number of more recent writers (both in the U.S. and abroad) who were inspired by him in turn. Readings will be drawn from shorter and longer works by Kobo Abe, Shelley Jackson, Kazuo Ishiguru, Thomas Bernhard, Lydia Davis, Philip Roth, George Saunders, Chris Adrian and Haruki Marukami. We'll also look at competing translations of a number of Kafka's short stories in a quest to pinpoint what constitutes "Kafkaesque" writing in English. Short papers and even shorter translation assignments. No knowledge of German required.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3336
WRIT
3336
62647
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3340x or y Fiction Seminar: Make It Strange 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT required. Making the familiar strange, making the strange familiar: these are among the most dexterous, variously re-imagined, catholically deployed, and evergreen of literary techniques. From Roman Jakobson and the Russian Formalists, to postmodern appropriations of pop culture references, techniques of defamiliarization and the construction of the uncanny have helped literature succeed in altering the vision of habit, habit being that which Proust so aptly describes as a second nature which prevents us from knowing the first. In this course, we will examine precisely how writers have negotiated and presented the alien and the domestic, the extraordinary and the ordinary. Looking at texts that both intentionally and unintentionally unsettle the reader, the class will pay special attention to the pragmatics of writerly choices made at the levels of vocabulary, sentence structure, narrative structure, perspective, subject matter, and presentations of time. Students will have four creative and interrelated writing assignments, each one modeling techniques discussed in the preceding weeks.

WRIT W3351x Poetry Seminar: Approaches to Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. One advantage of writing poetry within a rich and crowded literary tradition is that there are many poetic tools available out there, stranded where their last practitioners dropped them, some of them perhaps clichéd and overused, yet others all but forgotten or ignored. In this class, students will isolate, describe, analyze, and put to use these many tools, while attempting to refurbish and contemporize them for the new century. Students can expect to imitate and/or subvert various poetic styles, voices, and forms, to invent their own poetic forms and rules, to think in terms of not only specific poetic forms and metrics, but of overall poetic architecture (lineation and diction, repetition and surprise, irony and sincerity, rhyme and soundscape), and finally, to leave those traditions behind and learn to strike out in their own direction, to write -- as poet Frank O'Hara said -- on their own nerve.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3351
WRIT
3351
63441
001
Tu 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 15 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3353y Poetry Seminar: Traditions in Poetry 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. Despite forever attempting to "make it new", contemporary poetry is still in the process of describing issues of content, intent, style, and prosody already present at the dawning of the thing called poetry. In this course, students will investigate the origins of such traditions, and use the knowledge drawn from those investigations as a basis from which to study a sampling of American poetry of the 20th and 21st century. Students will encounter the "Low" and "High" American Modernisms; the return of the Elizabethan courtly in poets like ee cummings, Hart Crane, Edna St. Vincent Millay, and John Berryman; the stripped-down vulnerability of the Confessional School; the classical urbanitas of James Merrill or Frank O'Hara; the experimental eloquence of post-modern and Language poetry; and finally the New Sincerity, a plain-speaking contemporary movement which positions itself against superfluity, irony, and theory. As background, students can also expect to read selections of Plato's Gorgias and Phaedrus; Aristotle's Rhetoric; Cicero's The Orator; Seneca's Ad Lucilium Epistulae Morales; Quintilian's Institutio Oratoria; Horace's Epistles and Ars Poetica; Petrarch's Il Canzoniere; Thomas Wyatt's Complete Poems; George Gascoigne's Hundreth Sundrie Flowers; Philip Sidney's Astrophil and Stella; Samuel Daniel's Delia; Shakespeare's Sonnets, John Donne's Songs and Sonnets; Ben Jonson's Discoveries and The Forest; and George Herbert's The Temple. Though this course will operate around the usual seminar model (close reading, lecture, and classroom discussion), students will also be asked to keep a commonplace book in which they will engage critically with the readings and/or write their own poems/ imitations/exercises in response.

WRIT W3380x or y Translation Seminar: The European Fairy Tale 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. Corequisites: This course is open to undergraduate & graduate students.
Knowledge of another language is not required. Chances are you know something about the Brothers Grimm, but not so much, perhaps, about the complex storytelling traditions to which the stories collected belonged. This seminar will explore the European fairy tale in all its glorious history, including works written or collected by Charles Perrault, Jean de La Fontaine, Marie de Beaumont, Marie-Catherine d'Aulnoy (who first coined the term "conte de fée" or "fairy tale"), Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm, Alexander Afanasyev, Hans Christian Andersen, Oscar Wilde and George MacDonald. Throughout the semester, we'll be talking about issues of translation in these tales and comparing them to the fairy-tale-inspired writing of our own age, including work by Angela Carter, Robert Coover, Donald Barthelme, Kelly Link, Lyudmila Petrushevskaya, Yoko Tawada, George Saunders and others. Analytical, translational and fantastical assignments. No foreign language skills required. Three papers.

WRIT W3382x and y Fiction Seminar: Story Collection As Art Form Prerequisites: No prerequisites required. Department approval NOT required. How do story collections happen? Are they just anthologies of the best (or the only) stories a writer has produced in a given time period? How do you decide what goes in it, and how do you organize it, and how many do you need? In this class we're going to read a bunch of short story collections, in a variety of genres and modes. Rigorous literary, aesthetic, and critical analysis of individual stories will here be linked to macro-level questions such as: What makes a "linked collection" different from a novel? What are some of the ways that a "linked" collection forges its links-- character, theme, place, narrative strategy, mood, etc.? How does a writer handle her recurring themes without falling into repetition? How does the story collection compare with (or relate to) self-anthologizing forms in other disciplines: the poetry collection, the record album, the solo exhibition? Books include: The Piazza Tales by Herman Melville; Red Cavalry by Isaac Babel (Peter Constantine trans.); Super Flat Times by Matthew Derby; Normal People Don't Live Like This by Dylan Landis; The Train to Lo Wu by Jess Row; Don't Let Me Be Lonely by Claudia Rankine; Birds of America by Lorrie Moore; The Emigrants by W. G. Sebald; Criers and Kibbitzers, Kibbitzers and Criers by Stanley Elkin; The Actual Adventures of michael Missing by Michael Hickins; and A Personal Anthology by Jorge Luis Borges.

WRIT W3685x and y Poetry Seminar: Reduce, Reuse, Recycle 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites. Department approval NOT needed. This course is designed to address the particular frustrations surrounding revision. We will excavate our abandoned work-- subjecting it to maneuvers ranging from the light in touch to the radical; visiting techniques appropriate for the isolation chamber, as well as the collaborative. And we will examine how poets throughout the ages have approached revision -- including Lowell's changing of words into their opposites; Auden's revisions of his published work from the standpoint of maturity; Plath's 'next poem as revision' technique. The idea of the class borrows from the world's current trash predicament: how to cut our waste; re-use creatively what we have already produced; make something new and useful of our junk.

WRIT W3697x or y Senior Fiction Workshop 4 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course. Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor. The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major. Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work. In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3697
WRIT
3697
88496
001
M 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
H. Julavits 0 / 12 [ More Info ]

WRIT W3798x or y Senior Nonfiction Workshop 4 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course. Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor. The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major. Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work. In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3798
WRIT
3798
92846
001
Tu 11:00a - 12:50p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 12 [ More Info ]

Note: this course focuses on literature written for adults, NOT children's books or young-adult literature.

WRIT W3830x or y Fiction Seminar: Voices & Visions of Childhood 3 pts. Prerequisites: No prerequisites requires. Department approval NOT required. Flannery O'Connor famously said, "Anybody who has survived his childhood has enough information about life to last him the rest of his days." A child's or youth's journey-- whether through ordinary, universal rites of passage, or through extraordinary adventure or trauma-- compels an adult reader (and writer) to (re)inhabit the world as both naif and nature's savant. Through the knowing/unknowing eye of the child or adolescent, the writer can explore adult topics prismatically and poignantly -- "from the bottom up" -- via humor, terror, innoncence, wonder, or all of the above. In this course, we will read both long and short form examples of childhood and youth stories, examining in particular the relationships between narrator and character, character and world (setting), character and language and narrator and reader (i.e. "reliability" of narrator). Short scene-based writing assignments will challenge student writers to both mine their own memories for material and imagine voices/experiences far from their own. A final assignment will be a longer, complete story, built from one of the scenes.

WRIT W3898x or y Senior Poetry Workshop 4 pts. Prerequisites: Department approval required through writing sample. Please go to 617 Kent for submission schedule and guidelines or see http://www.columbia.edu/cu/writing Seniors who are majors in creative writing are given priority for this course. Enrollment is limited, and is by permission of the professor. The senior workshop offers students the opportunity to work exclusively with classmates who are at the same high level of accomplishment in the major. Students in the senior workshops will produce and revise a new and substantial body of work. In-class critiques and conferences with the professor will be tailored to needs of each student.

Course
Number
Call Number/
Section
Days & Times/
Location
Instructor Enrollment
Spring 2015 :: WRIT W3898
WRIT
3898
98296
001
Tu 2:10p - 4:00p
TBA
Instructor To Be Announced 0 / 12 [ More Info ]